Menu Contact Practice Areas Menu
${site.data.firmName}${SEMFirmNameAlt}
Free Phone Consultations
877-389-7395
Hablamos EspaƱol

8 clauses you might find in an employment contract

Florida employees may have questions about the employment contract they have on file with their employers. This is especially true if a problem or disagreement erupts on the job.

By turning to the contract, most employees can determine where they stand under the law, how they should negotiate the matter to reach agreement with their employers and whether they should pursue a lawsuit if an agreement cannot be made.

When reviewing an employment contract, a little bit of background information can be very valuable in understanding the types of clauses and information the average employee will find. There are some common things found in many Florida employment agreements.

Confidentiality agreements. These agreements require an employee not to share inside information regarding business dealings, secret processes, data, machinery or formulas with others. This confidentiality will extend beyond the time when the employee works for the employer. However, a confidentiality agreement will not apply to reporting illegal activity.

Noncompete agreements. These agreements prevent employees from going to work in the same industry or working for a competitor at a later time. These agreements are usually subject to time limitations of several months to a year, and they will also have geographic limitations. However, they are not always enforceable against an employee in all cases.

Termination clauses. Termination clauses will usually set the standards and protocols by which an employee may be terminated. They may also outline severance. If an employer fails to follow these guidelines, the termination could be unlawful.

There are numerous other parts and components of employment contracts. In order to make sure they avoid the potential of employment lawsuits or disagreements with their employers, Florida employees should make sure they understand the legal implications of any contract they sign.

Source: Gary A. Costales, PA, "Representation for Employees," accessed March 09, 2018

No Comments

Leave a comment
Comment Information
  • Super Lawyers
  •  The Florida Bar | Board Certified | Labor and Employment
  • American Bar Association | Defending Liberty Pursuing Justice
  • Best Lawyers | Linking Lawyers and Client Worldwide
Email Our Attorneys

We Are Ready To Help You

Please call our employment law offices at 305-375-9510 or fill out the form below to arrange a consultation.

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Privacy Policy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Linkedin